ex-9-6-05 - CECS 326 Lab Exercise 9/6/05 Due 9/8/05 Recall...

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Unformatted text preview: CECS 326 Lab Exercise 9/6/05 Due 9/8/05 Recall that in UNIX/Linux, for every valid command that we type, the shell starts a child process and tells child process to execute the utility code we requested. We shall learn the mechanics for creating a child process in this exercise. In Linux, all child processes are created by a fork system call. Detailed description of the system call may be found by typing man fork at your Linux prompt. The system should respond with the following man page: NAME fork - create a child process SYNOPSIS #include <sys/types.h> #include <unistd.h> pid_t fork(void); DESCRIPTION fork creates a child process that differs from the parent process only in its PID and PPID, and in the fact that resource utilizations are set to 0. File locks and pending signals are not inherited. Under Linux, fork is implemented using copy-on-write pages, so the only penalty incurred by fork is the time and memory required to duplicate the parent's page tables, and to create a unique task structure for the child.and memory required to duplicate the parent's page tables, and to create a unique task structure for the child....
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2010 for the course CECS 326 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at CSU Long Beach.

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ex-9-6-05 - CECS 326 Lab Exercise 9/6/05 Due 9/8/05 Recall...

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