Class_12_Performance_and_Motor_Control_Moodle

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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/12/10 Performance and Motor Control Characteristics of Functional Skills 4/12/10 Performance and Motor Control Specific characteristics of the performance of various motor skills provide the basis for much of our understanding of motor control  Speed-accuracy skills  Prehension  Handwriting  Bimanual Coordination 4/12/10 Speed-accuracy Skils  Speed-accuracy trade-off When both speed and accuracy are essential to perform the skill When speed is emphasized, accuracy is reduced and vice-versa 4/12/10 Speed-accuracy Skills  Fitts Law Paul Fitts (1954) showed we could mathematically predict movement time for speed accuracy skills  Movement distance  Target size  MT = a + b log2 (2D/W)  4/12/10 Speed-accuracy Skills MT = a + b log2 (2D/W) log2 (2D/W) = The index of 4/12/10 Speed-accuracy Skills  Fitts Law predicts MT motor skills: Dart throwing Peg-board manipulation task  Used in physical rehab assessment and training Reaching and grasping containers of different sizes Moving a cursor on a computer screen 4/12/10 Speed-accuracy Skills  Two motor control processes: 1. Open-loop control  Initial movement instructions sufficient to move limb to the vicinity of the target 2. Closed-loop control  Feedback from vision and proprioception needed at end of movement to ensure hitting target accurately 4/12/10 Prehension  General term for actions involving reaching for and grasping of objects Three components 1. Transport  Movement of the hand to the object 2. Grasp  The hand taking hold of the object 4/12/10 Prehension  Important motor control question concerns...
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Class_12_Performance_and_Motor_Control_Moodle - Click to...

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