Kravitz et al's Influence of Patients' Requests for Direct-to-Consumer Advertised Antidepressants-A

Kravitz et al's Influence of Patients' Requests for Direct-to-Consumer Advertised Antidepressants-A

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current as of March 24, 2010. Online article and related content http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/293/16/1995 . 2005;293(16):1995-2002 (doi:10.1001/jama.293.16.1995) JAMA Richard L. Kravitz; Ronald M. Epstein; Mitchell D. Feldman; et al. Trial Advertised Antidepressants: A Randomized Controlled Influence of Patients’ Requests for Direct-to-Consumer Correction Contact me if this article is corrected. http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/jama;294/19/2436 Correction is appended to this PDF and also available at Citations Contact me when this article is cited. This article has been cited 141 times. Topic collections Contact me when new articles are published in these topic areas. Therapy, Other Psychiatry; Depression; Randomized Controlled Trial; Drug Therapy; Drug Patient-Physician Relationship/ Care; Patient-Physician Communication; the same issue Related Articles published in . 2005;293(16):2030. JAMA Matthew F. Hollon. Direct-to-Consumer Advertising: A Haphazard Approach to Health Promotion Related Letters . 2005;294(6):678. JAMA Richard L. Kravitz et al. In Reply: . 2005;294(6):678. JAMA Franklin G. Miller et al. Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Physician Prescribing http://pubs.ama-assn.org/misc/permissions.dtl permissions@ama-assn.org Permissions http://jama.com/subscribe Subscribe reprints@ama-assn.org Reprints/E-prints http://jamaarchives.com/alerts Email Alerts at Princeton University on March 24, 2010 www.jama.com Downloaded from
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ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Influence of Patients’ Requests for Direct-to-Consumer Advertised Antidepressants A Randomized Controlled Trial Richard L. Kravitz, MD, MSPH Ronald M. Epstein, MD Mitchell D. Feldman, MD, MPhil Carol E. Franz, PhD Rahman Azari, PhD Michael S. Wilkes, MD, PhD Ladson Hinton, MD Peter Franks, MD S PENDING ON DIRECT -TO - consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription drugs in the United States totaled $3.2 billion in 2003. 1 Although expenditures may be leveling off, 2 DTC advertisements have become a stable, if controversial, fea- ture of the media landscape. 3-6 Critics charge that DTC advertisements lead to overprescribing of unnecessary, expen- sive, and potentially harmful medica- tions, while proponents counter that they can serve a useful educational function and help avert underuse of ef- fective treatments for conditions that may be poorly recognized, highly stig- matized, or both. 7 Antidepressant medications consis- tently rank among the top DTC adver- tising categories. 8,9 Major depressive dis- order (defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition as ± 5 depressive symp- toms lasting at least 2 weeks and ac- companied by functional impair- ment) 10 carries stigma, 11-13 is frequently For editorial comment see p 2030. Author Affiliations
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2010 for the course PSYCH 101 taught by Professor Gabbart during the Spring '08 term at Union College.

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Kravitz et al's Influence of Patients' Requests for Direct-to-Consumer Advertised Antidepressants-A

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