historymidterm - The British Parliament enacted a Bill of...

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Unformatted text preview: The British Parliament enacted a Bill of Rights in 1689 to justify the overthrowing of James II, listing Parliamentary powers such as control over taxation as well as the rights of individuals, such as the right to a trial by jury. The following year, they passed the Toleration Act which allowed Protestant dissenters to worship freely (but not Catholics) although only Anglicans could hold office. Compared to the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution significantly strengthened national authority. In order to go into effect, 9 out of 13 states needed to ratify it. Opponents were called anti-federalists, and among the most prominent were Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and Patrick Henry. They believe the Constitution shifted the balance from liberty to power. One of the key points they made was that the Constitution did not contain a Bill of Rights, leaving rights such as a trial by jury and freedom of speech and press unprotected. Most of the state constitutions contained bills of rights, and the anti- federalists pointed out the states were now being asked to surrender their power to the federal government with no...
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2010 for the course HIST 110 taught by Professor Aronoff during the Spring '09 term at Humboldt State University.

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historymidterm - The British Parliament enacted a Bill of...

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