Chapter08 - L8-1OutlineChapter 8. Stock ValuationnCommon...

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Unformatted text preview: L8-1OutlineChapter 8. Stock ValuationnCommon Stock ValuationnSome Features of Common and Preferred StocksnThe Stock MarketsnSummary and ConclusionsL8-2Common Stock ValuationnIn 1938, John Burr Williams postulated what has become the fundamental theory of valuation:The value today of any financial asset equals the present value of all of its future cash flows.nA share of stock is more difficult to value than a bond because:1. Promised cash-flows are not known in advance.2. The life of the investment is essentially forever.3. The market required rate of return is not easily observed. L8-3Common Stock ValuationExample:Suppose that you are considering to buy a share of stock today. You plan to sell the stock in one year. You somehow know that the stock will be worth $70 at that time. You predict that the stock will also pay a $10 per share dividend at the end of the year. If you require a 25 percent return on your investment, what is the most you would pay for the stock? In other words, what is the present value of the $10 dividend along with the $70 ending value at 25 percent?If you buy the stock today and sell it at the end of the year, you will have a total of $80 in cash. At 25 percent, Present value = ($10 + 70) / 1.25 = $64 Therefore, $64 is the value you would assign to the stock today.L8-4Common Stock Valuation (continued)nMore generally, let Pbe the current price of the stock, and assign P1to be the price in one period. If D1is the cash dividend paid at the end of one period, then we get:P= (D1+ P1) / (1 + R)where R is the required return in the market on this investment.So, to know the current price of the stock, we should know the price of the stock in one period, which may be even harder.What is the price in one period, P1? We dont know it in general. But, if we know the price in two periods, P2, then the stock price in one period would beP1 = (D2+ P2) / (1 + R) with the assumption that the dividend in two periods, D2, can be predicted. If we were to substitute this expression of P1 into our expression for P0, we get:P= [D1+ (D2 + P2) / (1 + R)] / (1 + R) = D1/(1 + R) + D2/(1 + R)2+ P2/(1 + R)2Finally, if we continue these substitutions, we get:P0 = D1/(1 + R) + D2/(1 + R)2 + D3/(1 + R)3 + . . .because if we push the sale of stocks far enough away then the present value of the future price will become zero. Hence,the price of the stock today is equal to the present value of all of the future dividends. L8-5Common Stock Valuation (continued)nWhat if the firm pays no dividends? Imagine a company that has a provision in its corporate charter that prohibits the paying of dividends now or ever. In other words, the corporation never pays out any money to stockholders in any form whatsoever....
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Chapter08 - L8-1OutlineChapter 8. Stock ValuationnCommon...

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