370L3 - EECS/CS 370 Instruction Set Architecture Lecture 3...

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EECS/CS 370 Instruction Set Architecture Lecture 3
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Lectures of Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) Design Lecture 3: Storage types and addressing modes Lecture 4: MIPS architecture Lecture 5: Calling functions / passing arguments Lecture 6: Translation software
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Instruction Set Design What instructions should be included? add, branch, load/store multiply, divide, sqrt mmx_add What storage locations? How many registers? How much memory? Any other “architected” storage? How should instructions be formatted? 0, 1, 2 or more operands?
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Why study instruction set design? Isn’t there only one? No, and even if there was it is too messy for a first course in computer architecture. How often are new architectures created? Embedded processors are designed all the time. Even the Pentium line changes (MXX, MXX2) Will I ever get to (have to) design one. Maybe, but you may not know you are.
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Instruction Encoding Since the EDSAC (1949) almost all computers stored program instructions the same way they store data. Each instruction is encoded as a number Opcode field: what instruction to perform. Operand fields: what data to perform it on. add R1 R2 100
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Storage Architecture Immediate Values Specifying constants in instructions Registers Fast and small (and useful) Memory Big and complex (and useful) Strange Storage Failed ideas and new research
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Immediate Values Small constant values placed in instructions They are stored in memory only because all instructions are in memory
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370L3 - EECS/CS 370 Instruction Set Architecture Lecture 3...

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