cjpaper - Nick Fortune December 8, 2005 CJ 190 Crime Myths...

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Nick Fortune December 8, 2005 CJ 190 Crime Myths Paper
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Myth 1 1. The first myth is the criminal justice system in the United States is too lenient on its offenders. Politicians, police officers and citizens say most criminals escape the punishment they most deserve. This myth also states if the judges imposed harsher sentences, we could deter some violent crimes and incapacitate those who choose to ignore the law. Police have been handcuffed since the passing of legislations like the Miranda rights bill which serve more as protection for criminals rather than the public (313). In reality, the United States serves harsher punishments than any other country. In the United States the sentence for burglary is harsher than in England or Canada. Also, The U.S. and England are the only two countries to sentence juveniles to life sentences (313). The incarceration rate here is higher than in any other country at 715 per 100,000 with the closest being Russia at 584 per 100,000 (315). The United States is the only Western industrial nation which has not abolished the death penalty (315). Spain which abolished the death penalty in 1978 and France in 1981 were the most recent nations to do so. Of the countries which do still allow the death penalty, the U.S. is the only one which allows the execution or people for crimes committed as juveniles. In fact, other than Iraq, the United States has executed more juveniles than any other country since 1985 (316). After examining capital punishment and incarceration rates, there is no evidence of leniency in the criminal justice system of the United States (316). 2. This myth creates a negative effect on the criminal justice system by creating a false sense of leniency among the courts. This in turn could cause judges to give sentences that are either to harsh or to weak for the crime which was committed to
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try and downplay the myth. If this happens they would be doing an injustice to
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2010 for the course ENGL ? taught by Professor Askins during the Fall '05 term at W. Carolina.

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cjpaper - Nick Fortune December 8, 2005 CJ 190 Crime Myths...

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