astronomers - 53 b. The same is true for real astronomers...

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Unformatted text preview: 53 b. The same is true for real astronomers at the South Pole. The Sun is above the horizon for half the year. It rises in September and sets in March. During these months, no matter when you set your alarm clock, you always wake up and go to sleep in broad daylight. But for the other half of the year, the Sun never rises. Similarly, other objects in the heavens are visible for months at a time. During those months, they remain at about the same distance above the horizon. Welcome to the Dark Sector. The South Pole observatories are located about 800 meters (half a mile) from the main station, on the other side of the airplane runway. The mirror is for the AST/RO submillimeter telescope, which, appropriately, probes the cold gas in interstellar space. Photo ?1994 Maohai Huang. Used by permission of Maohai Huang. Caldwell recalls a talk by Kepler's Principal Investigator, William Borucki, on the observing advantages of the South Pole with its long nights, "Earth-surface projects present problems,...
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2010 for the course ASTR 4 taught by Professor Toebe,c during the Spring '08 term at City College of San Francisco.

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astronomers - 53 b. The same is true for real astronomers...

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