Death In Venice- Article - \u201cAschenbach noted with astonishment that the boy was perfectly beautiful His face pale and gracefully reserved was

Death In Venice- Article - u201cAschenbach noted with...

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“Aschenbach noted with astonishment that the boy was perfectly beautiful. His face, pale and gracefully reserved, was framed by honey-colored curls. He had a straight nose and a lovely mouth and wore an expression of exquisite, divine solemnity. It was a face reminiscent of Greek statues from the noblest period of antiquity; it combined perfection of form with a unique personal charm that caused the onlooker to doubt ever having met with anything in nature or the art that could match its perfection” (pg 1855). Throughout Thomas Mann’s Death in Venice we see that the artist Gustav Aschenbach is somewhat of a perfectionist. Not only is he very strict and critical of his own work but of other people as well, most notably on the way they look. It is not uncommon in today’s world to hear about the latest way to get rid of wrinkles, look younger, or what the perfect body shape looks like. As the generations before us begin to age more rapidly, they realize that they are being pushed out for younger and better looking versions of themselves. They begin to grasp at the last strands they can find to bring them back to vitality even if it means going under the knife and mutating their body. Such as Aschenbach, over the years our society has become obsessed with perfection and obtaining the “perfect” look. The question is has it gone too far, or can we quit before it consumes our very being and destroys us as it did Aschenbach.

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