lec11 - COMP201 Java Programming Part II: GUI Programming...

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COMP201 Java Programming Part II: GUI Programming Topic 11: Applets Chapter 10
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COMP201 Topic 11 / Slide 2 Outline Introduction What are applets? How to run? Applets basics Class loader and JAR files Security basics Applet life cycle Converting applications to applets Resources for applets Communication with browser
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COMP201 Topic 11 / Slide 3 Introduction So far, we’ve only covered topics related to stand-alone applications An applet is designed to run within a browser Bring web pages to life Reason behind hype in Java Note: Java is not a language for designing web pages. It is a tool for bring them to life.
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COMP201 Topic 11 / Slide 4 Introduction / JApplet Class An applet is a Java class which extends java.applet.Applet If Swing components are used, the applet must extend from javax.swing.JApplet We will only discuss applets that extend JApplet JApplet is a sub-class of Applet, which in turn is a subclass of Panel Event handling exactly the same as before
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COMP201 Topic 11 / Slide 5 Introduction /First Applet public class NotHelloWorldApplet extends JApplet { public void init() { Container contentPane = getContentPane(); JLabel label = new JLabel("Not a Hello, World applet", SwingConstants.CENTER); contentPane.add(label); } } // NotHelloWorldApplet.java
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COMP201 Topic 11 / Slide 6 Compare with class NotHelloWorldFrame extends JFrame { public NotHelloWorldFrame() { setTitle("NotHelloWorld"); setSize(300, 200); Container contentPane = getContentPane(); contentPane.add( new NotHelloWorldPanel()); } } public class NotHelloWorld { public static void main ( String [] args) { NotHelloWorldFrame frame = new NotHelloWorldFrame (); frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE); frame.show(); } Introduction /First Applet
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COMP201 Topic 11 / Slide 7 Applets are created, run, and destroyed by web browser Don’t set size for an applet: determined by HTML file. Don’t set title for an applet: applets cannot have title bars. No need to explicitly construct an applet. Construction code placed inside the init method. There is no main method. An applet cannot be closed. It terminates automatically when the browser exit. No need to call method show . An applet is displayed automatically. Introduction /First Applet
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Introduction / Running An Applet 1. Compile the .java file 2. Create a HTML file that tells the browser which file to load and how to size the applet <html><body> This is an example. <applet code=“NotHelloWorldApplet.class” width=300 height=300> This text shown if browser doesn’t do Java. </applet> </body></html> 1. View the HTML file with a browser or the command appletviewer (for testing). This works for applets extending
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2010 for the course COMP COMP 201 taught by Professor Nil during the Spring '02 term at HKUST.

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lec11 - COMP201 Java Programming Part II: GUI Programming...

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