D2L - SPP Thursday 5 - Lottery & Hampton

D2L - SPP Thursday 5 - Lottery & Hampton - Clip:...

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Clip: Lottery
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Thursday, Week 5 Thursday, Week 5
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Class Breakdown 1. 1. Introduction Introduction 2. 2. Consent: Tacit vs. Explicit Consent: Tacit vs. Explicit o Lottery: Video Clip Lottery: Video Clip 3. 3. Hampton’s Consent Theory Hampton’s Consent Theory 4. 4. Utilitarianism Utilitarianism
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John Locke John Locke Two Treatises of Government
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Locke’s Influence “Life, liberty and estate” (natural, negative rights) turned into “Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”
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Locke’s Reasoning 1. Equality (in Reason) 2. Fundamental Law of Nature In the State of Nature Problem of irrational individuals 3. Benefits of association 4. Hiring a Ruler (who can later be fired)
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Fundamental Law of Nature Humans will preserve life, health, possessions of others as long as doesn’t compromise their own preservations We recognize the “natural rights” of others
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Irrational Members Irrational members ruin it for everybody They do not recognize the FLoN Or do not recognize it correctly (e.g., bias) This imperils everyone, and so the prisoner’s dilemma works much the same as in Hobbes
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Steps toward Creating the State 1. Talk amongst each other 2. Each individual consent to become a member of the “civil society” 3. The civil society “hires” a ruler/rulers 4. Whom they can fire based on job performance
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1. Why does Hobbes believe a absolute ruler (the Sovereign) is necessary? 2. Which do you feel has a more accurate characterization of humans in the State of Nature: Hobbes or Locke?
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Problems with Hobbes & Locke
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Hobbes’ Alienation? Alienation is either too strict or it’s actually really agency citizens can overthrow the ruler (agency) or citizens seem enslaved when they might be better off in the State of Nature or they, at least, could have had a better ruler: false dichotomy between SoN free-man and domesticated slave
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Agency between the civil society & government But alienation between the individual and the civil society Can never get that power back! Just like Hobbesian alienation
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D2L - SPP Thursday 5 - Lottery & Hampton - Clip:...

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