Dallas,Texas - Big D Dallas is the third-largest city in...

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“Big D”
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Dallas is the third-largest city in Texas and is the seat of Dallas County and the cultural and economic center of the 12-county Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metropolitan area known as the "Metroplex." Surprisingly, Dallas is a cosmopolitan city that has a reputation as the well dressed cousin of Houston and San Antonio. Although you will see a few cowboy hats and boots they're the norm.
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Dallas is on the three forks section of the Trinity River and its founder was John Neely Bryan, who settled here in November 1841. Bryan had selected the best location to cross the river and decided that it was the best location for a trading post to serve the population moving through the region. By 1880 the population had more than tripled, to 10,385. On March 30, 1846, Dallas County was organized. On April 18, Dallas became the temporary county seat, and a tiny log cabin served as the first courthouse.
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In 1846, the first hotel, private school, and church were established. And the first cotton crop was planted. Cotton quickly became a major cash crop. In 1849, the first newspaper, the Cedar Snag, was printed. This paper was later renamed the Dallas Herald . Dallas was incorporated as a town in 1856. Samuel Pryor was elected the first mayor. Dallas continued to grow steadily. In 1861, Dallas County voted 741-237 for secession. On June 8, a state of war was declared. Many Southerners came to the Dallas area to rebuild their fortunes after the war. They could no longer maintain plantations, but the farm land of North Texas meant opportunity. Dallas continued to grow during the Reconstruction years, unlike other Southern towns that had to rebuild first. Dallas had also become the center of the buffalo market .
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On July 16, 1872, the first passenger train, the Houston and Texas Central, steamed into Dallas. In 1873, the Texas and Pacific came. With the arrival of the trains, the population soared, from 3,000 in early 1872 to more than 7,000 in September of the same year. New businesses and buildings appeared daily. Telegraph lines came into town, connecting Dallas with the outside world. Dallas was now a concentration point for raw materials, such as grain and cotton, shipped to the South and East. It was a last chance for people traveling farther west to get supplies. Large, grand hotels were being built but most buildings remained plain and utilitarian. Utilities, such as water and gas, became available. In 1871, the first volunteer fire company, Dallas Hook and Ladder Company #1, was organized. Gas lamps lighted Dallas streets in 1874. The first telephone line linked the water company to the fire station in 1880 This intense growth did not come without problems. Farmers struggled to get fair prices for their crops.
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2010 for the course PSY Psy101 taught by Professor Dhabi during the Spring '10 term at Abu Dhabi University.

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Dallas,Texas - Big D Dallas is the third-largest city in...

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