{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Test 3 Review - WOODPANELING...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
WOOD PANELING Know the 2 types: Solid and Veneer (uses substrate) Know Veneer cuts and the illustrations.       Bookmatch      slip match       random match. What are the differences between these different cuts? How does wood come?      Solid and veneer with substrate (can be plywood, fiber board, and particle  board) What are the cuts for paneling?  If you use veneer, you either could get more or less our of the board depending on its  cut Most veneer is rotary or plain sliced.       Rotary slicing is most common. It gives you long continuous sheets. Easy  to get a variety of patterns and repeats. Also the least expensive. Why do we use veneer?      Its finished. What kinds of finishes are appropriate?  Where are these finishes appropriate for? Floor? Wall? What are the various graining patterns that you can specify when you are working with  solid wood? TILE What are the different types? Clay: Earthenware, stoneware, sundried
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Natural mined material Colors varied, inherent Extruded: uniform size and thickness, often thinset Handmade: irregular size and thickness, thick set Kiln fired: glazed/unglazed Low temp: unglazed, sun dried must be sealed Porcelain: Porcelain clay body colored w/ pigments Fire grained clay, minimal water during process Often unglazed, color consistent throughout High temp. fire and clay type makes impervious stains Surfaces: Polished, be mechanical grinding, strength Shiny surface Matte, w/fine strippled texture, good slip resistances Textured, grainy/cleft, excellent slip resistance Glass: Cast into molds Integral color, or backed enamel finish Clear/ translucent w/ polished/matte surface Opaque w/ backed enamel finish Recycled tiles available Stone: Processed for uniform thickness and size Smooth/cleft face
Image of page 2
Must be sealed Concrete: Many sized and colors Molded and cured Sealed  May be combined w/ opposite materials of recycle or reprocessed  concrete Metal: Characteristic inherent to metal type Pressed/cast for surface variation 3 general categories:       Clay, porcelain (type of clay), earth based or fired, natural stone. What are the characteristics of each of these? What makes stoneware tile different than porcelain tile?  Why would you use stoneware over porcelain and vice versa?      Porcelain is not glazed, it is polished. Because it has a clay body you can  add surface color (unless it is thin glazed). Color is consistent all the way  through. Chips do not show readily.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern