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Chapter 1 Notes - History 1 Chapter 1 Notes Siberian Nomads...

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History 1: Chapter 1 Notes Siberian Nomads crossed the Bering Strait into Alaska and colonized the America’s. In the following ten thousand years they separated into the civilizations of Ancient Mexico, Southwest America, Eastern Woodlands, Great Plains, Great Basin, Pacific Northwest, and Arctic. Over the course of pre- colonial times they began developing advanced agriculture, economics, religion, architecture, city structure, and social organization. These societies developed when food surplus allowed them to settle and increase population growth. With more individuals, people could take specialized jobs, and excel at certain tasks. There was conflict and combat between certain cultures, but the continental economy also flourished with trading. After a golden period these civilizations collapsed, for mysterious reasons, giving way too many regional cultures that left the America’s divided by regional tribes. The fact that these civilizations were advanced and extremely complex was not understood until later analysis of the ruins they left. General Notes - Central cultures fall; regional culture develops (each using land in particularly efficient ways) - Because of North-South orientation, alternative climates meant different tech and culture, making cultural, technological transfer difficult - This created amazing cultural diversity, but hindered intercultural growth -Lack of agricultural tech spread due to different climates, food surpus/city building could not occur at the pace that it did in Europe - Most large mammal population destroyed by ending Ice-age (only llama’s are feasible) - No good domestic animals, they domesticated ducks, dogs, llamas, turkeys, and G-pigs - B/c many major diseases are from domestic animals, NA never had a chance to immunize - European explorers carried unintroduced diseases that killed many NA
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