Genetics - Diffusion and Osmosis Using Dialysis Tubing...

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Diffusion and Osmosis Using Dialysis Tubing Brett Larose BSC 2010 Lab Section # 36 Seat Number #45 10/2/2008 By signing below, I guarantee that I am the sole author of this laboratory report: Name: _________________________________________ Date :__________________________________
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Introduction Diffusion is a process in which molecules are dispersed evenly throughout available space. These molecules move randomly and constantly from an area where they are more concentrated to an area where they are less concentrated. Once the concentration of molecules is spread out equally, a dynamic equilibrium has been reached —where molecules are crossing paths across a membrane at the same rate (Campbell and Reese 2008). Diffusion is a significant event in animals because diffusion allows materials to be exchanged between a cell and its environment (Tro 2008). Osmosis is a particular form of diffusion. In this type of diffusion, water molecules move from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of a higher solute concentration until there are equal concentrations on both sides of the membrane. Osmosis is a necessary function in all organisms since the balance of water between the cell and its environment is fundamental to survival (Tro 2008). In order to understand cell behavior within a solution, it is very important to understand the concept of tonicity—the ability of a solution to cause a cell to gain or lose water. Tonicity compares the solute and solvent concentrations of two different solutions. For instance, when comparing two solutions, a hypertonic solution would contain more solutes (the lesser part of a solution) than the other solution being compared. A hypotonic solution would contain less solutes than the other solution being compared. By signing below, I guarantee that I am the sole author of this laboratory report: Name: ___________________________________________ Date: ___________________________
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An isotonic solution would have an equal amount of solute than the other solution being compared (Walters et al. 2008). Both passive and active transport are two different types of diffusion. Passive transport is a process in which the cell does not require energy to initiate. Energy isn’t required to initiate the reaction because molecules naturally move through the membrane from areas of higher concentrations to areas of lower concentrations. The concentration gradient is the region in which the density of a chemical substance decreases, which naturally causes energy potential. Active transport is a process in which the cell requires energy to initiate. Active transport requires energy because it takes work to pump a solute through the concentration gradient, so ATP supplies the energy required to initiate the process (Campbell and Reece 2008). In summary, diffusion is a process that occurs in organisms, and is vital to
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2010 for the course PCB 3063 taught by Professor Sotero during the Fall '09 term at University of Central Florida.

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Genetics - Diffusion and Osmosis Using Dialysis Tubing...

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