Study_Guide_for_Exam_2

Study_Guide_for_Exam_2 - Be sure to read over this study...

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Be sure to read over this study guide, things in italics are things Ross and I have added. We are putting this out early so that you can apply it to your speeches. Be sure to incorporate the necessary components because Karen will be looking for them. If you would like to practice your speech in front of us, email Ross (rhm5023) and I (jpl5073) and we can arrange a meeting. Study Guide for Exam 2 Chapter 8 1. The Nature and Goals of Persuasive Speech Coercion vs. Persuasion A. Two Types of Persuasive Speaking a. Convincing b. Motivating 2. Persuasion and Policy Advocacy a. Deliberative Speaking: A. Purpose is to make listeners agree with your proposal b. Policy-Advocacy Speech c. Ethos, Pathos and Logos d. Audience Analysis and Adaptation 3. Designing the Policy-Advocacy Speech A. Developing the Purpose and the Thesis (Invention) 1. Purpose: To make audience agree or to produce conviction 2. Thesis: They must agree or believe in 3. Inventing or Discovering Arguments and other means of Persuasion (Invention) a. Identify Main ideas i. Requirements 1. Listener needs to know your plan 2. Prove your plan should be implemented 3. Your plan is possible
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4. Your plan will help and be fair 5. Your plan is the best 4. Research supporting material a. Find that serves evidence for your arguments, provides creditable testimony, and appeals to emotions of audience Research that goes along with Ethos, Pathos and Logos 5. Develop arguments/appeals a. Ethos, Pathos and Logos B. Structuring the Deliberative Speech (Arrangement) C. Effective use of Language (Style) D. Practicing and Delivering the Speech (Memory/Delivery) 4. Logos: Inductive and Deductive Reasoning We best remember logos by thinking of logic a. The nature of reasoning and argument A. Argument B. Premises C. Claim 1. Factual Claims a. Drinking and driving kills 2. Value Claims a. A women has the right to decide if she wants to have an abortion 3. Policy Claims a. The government should pull our troops out of Iraq 5. Inductive Reasoning a. The Nature of Induction A. Definition: reasoning from particular facts to a general, factual conclusion. B. Tools to use: 1. Examples
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2. Specific instances 3. Statistics b. Standards of Validity 1. Number of Examples/Sample Size a. Is your reasoning supported by the good sample size. Karen said 4/5 doctors is not a good sample size, but 400,000 out of 500,000 is a very good size even though 100,000 doctors disagreed 2. Representativeness a. Your statistics must be able to be generalize to the population. If you took a sample size of 1000 Texans on the death penalty, those results would not be able to be generalize to the rest of the nation. 3. Counter-Examples a. The audience may know of an example that would contradict your claim Your claim may be that smoking causes cancer, though a listener may have an aunt that has been smoking all her life and has no problems 6. Deductive Reasoning a. The Nature of Deduction A. Move from a general principle, plus a specific fact and something, to a
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Study_Guide_for_Exam_2 - Be sure to read over this study...

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