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resis_in_par - Resistors in Parallel Resistors in series...

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1 Resistors in Parallel Resistors in series have the same current flowing through them. Resistors in parallel have the same voltage across them. In the schematic below, r1 and r2 have identical voltages across them, but have different currents flowing through them. This configuration is also known as a current divider . Elements in parallel have the same voltage across them and may have differing currents. This makes sense intuitively when you think about it. For example, Ohms law tells us that the current through a resistor is inversely proportional to its resistance. Thus the 6 ohm resistor r1 will have three times the current flowing through it that the eighteen ohm resistor r2 would. In the example above, the currents through r1 and r2 will be: Ir1 = 12/6 = 2A (three times the current that r2 is passing) Ir2 = 12/18 = 0.67A Both r1 and r2 have the same voltage across them since they are in parallel. When two resistors (or
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