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0200.1 - i APPLICATIONS OF CLASSICAL PHYSICS Roger D...

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i APPLICATIONS OF CLASSICAL PHYSICS Roger D. Blandford and Kip S. Thorne California Institute of Technology 2002—2003
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ii CONTENTS [Version 0200.1, 26 September 2002] Note: Concurrently with the 2002–2003 course Ph136, we are producing a final revision of this book. The following table of contents is for the 2000-2001 version of the book, which is available on the Web at http:http://www.pma.caltech.edu/Courses/ph136/ph136.html 1. Physics in Flat Spacetime: Geometric Viewpoint 1.1 Overview 1.2 Foundational Concepts 1.3 Tensor Algebra Without a Coordinate System 1.4 Particle Kinetics and Lorentz Force Without a Reference Frame 1.5 Component Representation of Tensor Algebra 1.6 Particle Kinetics in Index Notation and in a Lorentz Frame 1.7 Orthogonal and Lorentz Transformations of Bases, and Spacetime Diagrams 1.8 Time Travel 1.9 Directional Derivatives, Gradients, Levi-Civita Tensor, Cross Product and Curl 1.10 Nature of Electric and Magnetic Fields; Maxwell’s Equations 1.11 Volumes, Integration, and the Gauss and Stokes Theorems 1.12 The Stress-energy Tensor and Conservation of 4-Momentum I. STATISTICAL PHYSICS 2. Kinetic Theory 2.1 Overview of this Chapter 2.2 Phase Space and Distribution Function 2.3 Other Normalizations for the Distribution Function 2.4 Thermal Equilibrium 2.5 Number-Flux Vector and Stress-Energy Tensor 2.6 Perfect Fluids and Equations of State
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iii 2.7 Evolution of the Distribution Function: Liouville’s Theorem, the Vlasov Equation and the Boltzmann Transport Equation 2.8 Transport Coefficients
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iv 3. Statistical Mechanics 3.1 Overview 3.2 Systems, Ensembles, and Distribution Functions 3.3 Liouville’s Theorem and the Evolution of the Distribution Function 3.4 Statistical Equilibrium 3.5 The Microcanonical Ensemble and the Ergodic Hypothesis 3.6 Entropy and the Evolution into Statistical Equilibrium 3.7 Statistical Mechanics of an Ideal Monatomic Gas 3.8 Statistical Mechanics in the Presence of Gravity: Galaxies, Black Holes, the Universe, and Evolution of Structure in the Early Universe 3.9 Entropy and Information [not yet written] 4. Statistical Thermodynamics 4.1 Overview 4.2 Microcanonical Ensemble and the Energy Representation of Thermodynamics 4.3 Canonical Ensemble and the Free-Energy Representation of Thermodynamics 4.4 The Gibbs Representation of Thermodynamics; Phase Transitions and Chemical Reactions 4.5 Fluctuations of Systems in Statistical Equilibrium 4.6 The Ising Model and Renormalization Group Methods 4.7 Monte Carlo Methods [not yet written] 5. Random Processes Note: In 2000–2001 we will expand this chapter and break it into two. 5.1 Overview 5.2 Random Processes and their Probability Distributions 5.3 Correlation Function, Spectral Density, and Ergodicity 5.4 Noise and its Types of Spectra 5.5 Filters, Signal-to-Noise Ratio and Shot Noise 5.6 The Evolution of a System Interacting with a Heat Bath: Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem, Fokker-Planck Equation and Brownian Motion
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v II. OPTICS 6. Geometrical Optics 6.1 Overview 6.2 Waves in a Homogeneous Medium 6.3 Waves in an Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Medium: The Eikonal Approximation 6.4 Paraxial Optics 6.5 Polarization and the Berry Phase
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