lecture-2.2 - Lecture notes 2.2 1 1.1 Consonants continued...

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Lecture notes: 2.2 June 25, 2009 1 Consonants continued 1.1 Palatoalveolar and palatal consonants No very clear-cut distinction between the two. Usually a language uses only one of these two positions for a certain type of conso- nant. So in English, we have a few from each category, but no contrasts: palato-alveolar fricatives [ S , Z ] she, rouge; palatal approximant: [j] yes In English, the only palato-alveolar sounds are the fricatives and affricates [ S Z > t S > d Z ]. Other languages, such as French and Italian, there are nasals made in either the same or a very similar position. These nasals are often, arbitrarily, considered to be palatal sounds. No language is known to make a distinction between a palato-alveolar nasal and a palatal nasal. There are languages which contrast, for example, voiceless palato-alveolar fricatives and voiceless palatal fricatives, e.g. Modern Greek, German. To produce [¸ c], start by pronouncing [j], and devoice it: [j j j j j j j ˚ j ˚ j ˚ j ˚ j ˚ ]. [¸ c] is very similar to the sound which occurs initially in hue [hju]. The German palatal fricative, as in “ich”. Greek has both voiceless and voiced versions: (1) Greek: http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/course/chapter11/greek/greek.html The voiced counterpart of [¸ c] is [ J ], the voiced palatal fricative. (Note that the symbol, 1
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a curly-tailed j, differs subtly from the symbol for the palatal approximant or glide: [j].) (2) Margi: http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/appendix/languages/margi/margi.html Palatal nasals and laterals [ ñ , L ] (3) Italian: http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/course/chapter7/italian/italian.html
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  • Spring '09
  • FARKAS
  • International Phonetic Alphabet, Ladefoged, Labiovelars, German voiceless velar, voiceless palatal fricatives, voiceless palato-alveolar fricatives

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