lecture-8.2 - Lecture notes 8.2 1 Morphological analysis...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture notes: 8.2 July 16, 2009 1 Morphological analysis 1.1 Nahuatl Nahuatl (aka Aztec) languages are spoken by over a million people in Mexico. (1) Nahuatl words: 1. ikalwewe ‘his big house’ 9. petat > tsi : n ‘little mat’ 2. ikalsosol ‘his old house’ 10. ikalmeh ‘his houses’ 3. ikal > tsi : n ‘his little house’ 11. komitmeh ‘cooking pots’ 4. komitwewe ‘big cooking pot’ 12. petatmeh ‘mats’ 5. komitsosol ‘old cooking pot’ 13. ko : jame > tsi : n ‘little pig’ 6. komit > tsi : n ‘little cooking pot’ 14. ko : jamewewe ‘big male pig’ 7. petatwewe ‘big mat’ 15. ko : jameilama ‘big female pig’ 8. petatsosol ‘old mat’ 16. ko : jamemeh ‘pigs’ (2) Nahuatl morphemes: {-meh } plural marker {-wewe } ‘big’ (occurs with stems meaning ‘his house’, ‘cooking-pot’, ‘mat’, ‘male pig‘) {-ilama } ‘big’ (occurs with stem meaning ‘female pig’) {-sosol } ‘old’ {- > tsi : n } ‘little’ { petat } ‘mat’ { ko : jame } ‘pig’ { komit } ‘cooking-pot’ { ikal } ‘his house’ Word template for Nahuatl: (3) Noun - Adjectival suffix - Number This is not fully determined by the data. I have made a guess and assumed that the plural suffix can co-occur with the adjectival suffixes, and that it follows the...
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lecture-8.2 - Lecture notes 8.2 1 Morphological analysis...

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