9visualcortices_2009

9visualcortices_2009 - The lenses of the eye(like typical...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The lenses of the eye (like typical lenses) focus light on the retina in such a way that the projection of the visual scence is upside and backwards. Descartes , Le Dioptrique 1637, after Kepler The visual fields projected on the retina before the lens flips the world upside down and backwards The visual fields projected on the retina after inversion by the lenses Most of the visual field is seen by both eyes. This is labeled, binocular visual field. The partial decussation of the optic nerve ensures that each half of the brain receives input from one full hemifield -- the right hemifield is “seen” by the left side of the brain and the left hemifield by the right side. to the left thalamus (LGN) Retinal axons travel from the eye to the thalamus. Relay cells in thalamus project to the cortex. The mylinated axons of relay cells form a thick stripe in the primary visual cortex, aka striate cortex, occipital cortex, V1 or area 17 (you don't have to memorize the names.)(you don't have to memorize the names....
View Full Document

Page1 / 20

9visualcortices_2009 - The lenses of the eye(like typical...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online