North Africa - Written for an African History/Civilization...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
M c L e a n  | 1 Department of History Oakwood University “The Arab influence on North Africa” By Orchadia McLean For the course: African Civilization (HI325) Submitted to: Prof. Saunders
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
M c L e a n  | 2   December …, 2008 The Arabization of North Africa North Africa of the modern world no longer seems to truly apart of the continent. In  fact there are historians who question it’s relation to the rest of black Africa. Recent  history seems to confirm the validity in the questioning of the “African Identity”  found in the Northern portion of the African continent, from the alliance of Algeria,  Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia (even Mauritania) with the Arab League, to the  refusal of many North Africans to be called ‘African’. Dominated by Arabs, it is hard  to see what common culture the five countries of North Africa share with their  continental neighbors. In examining the history of North African we can deduce as  to how this dramatic cultural and racial shift occurred. Who was there first? The people of North Africa today are a mix of Arabs from the east, original Berbers  (some of whom identify as Arab), some Pakistanis, Turks, Indians and various  Europeans. Increasingly, other Africans are traveling across the Sahara to North  Africa. Southern Europe is all-too familiar with irregular migration from North  African countries such as Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia. Since the early 1990s,  thousands of North Africans have attempted to cross the Mediterranean to reach  Spain and Italy. But, as the migration crises in Morocco's Spanish enclaves in 2005 
Background image of page 2
M c L e a n  | 3 and Spain's Canary Islands in 2006 made clear, sub-Saharan Africans are  increasingly migrating to North African countries, with some using the region as a  point of transit to Europe and some remaining in North Africa. These migrants  come from an increasingly diverse array of countries and regions, such as Senegal,  the Gambia, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, and Nigeria as well  as the Democratic Republic of Congo, Cameroon, Sudan, the Horn of Africa, and  even Asia. 1  However, going back into the history of North Africa a few thousand  years presents a different picture. Professor Dwight Reynolds of University of  California, Santa Barbara in his interview with “AfroPop” radio host and senior editor, Banning Eyre talks about the identity and heritage of this region. “The indigenous  culture of North Africa, before the arrival of the Phoenicians, the period of Greek  influence, and the Roman conquest, was of course the people that we now call the  Berbers.  The term Berber is problematic for a number of different reasons.  First of 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 15

North Africa - Written for an African History/Civilization...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online