A1354512403_16701_21_2017_ac circuit.ppt - Chapter 11 Alternating Current Objectives \u2022 After completing this chapter you will be able to \u2013 Describe

A1354512403_16701_21_2017_ac circuit.ppt - Chapter 11...

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Chapter 11 Alternating Current
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Objectives After completing this chapter, you will be able to: Describe how an AC voltage is produced with an AC generator (alternator) Define alternation , cycle , hertz , sine wave , period , and frequency Identify the parts of an AC generator (alternator)
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Objectives (cont’d.) Define peak , peak-to-peak , effective , and rms Explain the relationship between time and frequency Identify and describe three basic nonsinusoidal waveforms Describe how nonsinusoidal waveforms consist of the fundamental frequency and harmonics
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Objectives (cont’d.) Understand why AC is used in today’s society Describe how an AC distribution system works
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There are two types of electricity used to perform work, such as lighting bulbs or running motors. Direct current (DC), as its name implies, is a current that flows in one direction only. Batteries develop this type of energy. The second type of energy used today to perform useful work is alternating current (AC). Unlike its converse, direct current, the direction of alternating current flow reverses with regularity. Today, alternating current is the most used method to transmit electrical energy from one location to another.
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Introduction In late 1800, Edison used Direct Current. His vision of electrified cities incorporated the idea of many small, DC-generating stations scattered about in the community, because there was no way to change or alter direct current to recoup transmission losses. This limited the usefulness of DC to small, local areas and prohibited its usefulness in transmitting electrical energy over long distances. Many small DC-generating stations.
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