ap_chapter_10_notes - ElectionsandVotingBehavior Chapter10

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Elections and Voting Behavior Chapter 10
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How American Elections Work Three types of elections: Select party nominees Select officeholders Referendum: State voters approve or disapprove proposed legislation. Often used for constitutional amendments.
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How American Elections Work Initiative: Voters in some states propose legislation to be voted on. Requires a specific number of signatures to be valid. Usually the work of policy entrepreneurs. Can still be voted down by the people.
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A Tale of Three Elections 1800:  The First Electoral Transition of Power No primaries, no conventions, no speeches Newspapers were very partisan Campaigns focused on state legislatures- they were the  ones that chose the Electoral College After many votes in the House, power was finally  transferred to Jefferson peacefully
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A Tale of Three Elections 1896:  A Bitter Fight over Economic Interests Democrat’s main issue: Unlimited coinage of silver, but  no candidate. William Jennings Bryan won the nomination with  speeches about the virtues of silver. McKinley won the election, and the Republicans became  the party of power.
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A Tale of Three Elections 2000:  Big Mess In Florida, the difference was small enough to have a  recount. Bush and Gore differed on which ballots to count and  how to count them. Various legal disputes ensued, and the U.S. Supreme  Court let Bush’s election lead stand. How big a factor was Nader?
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Whether to Vote: A Citizen’s First Choice Deciding Whether to Vote U.S. typically has low voter turnouts. Some argue it is a rational choice to not vote. Political Efficacy :  The belief that one’s political  participation really matters. Civic Duty : The belief that in order to support democratic  government, a citizen should always vote.
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Whether to Vote: A Citizen’s First Choice Registering To Vote Voter Registration:  A system adopted by the states that  requires voters to register well in advance of the election  day. North Dakota has no registration system. Motor Voter Act:  Requires states to permit people to  register to vote when they apply for their driver’s license.
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Whether to Vote: A Citizen’s First Choice Who Votes? Education
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ap_chapter_10_notes - ElectionsandVotingBehavior Chapter10

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