{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

ch._2_ap_notes - Chapter 2 The Constitution Click to edit...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/19/10 Chapter 2 The Constitution
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/19/10 History
Image of page 2
4/19/10 Colonial Mind Believed that British politicians were corrupt and thus the English constitution was inadequate to protect citizens’ liberty Believed in a higher law embodying natural rights ° “Life, Liberty, and Property” (Hobbes) “Pursuit of Happiness”(Jefferson) War of ideology, not economics
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4/19/10 Real Revolution The “real” revolution was the radical change in belief about what made authority legitimate and liberties secure Government by consent, not prerogative Political power exercise by direct grant of power in a written constitution
Image of page 4
4/19/10 Weaknesses of Confederacy Could not levy taxes or regulate commerce Sovereignty, independence retained by states 1 vote in Congress for each state 9 of 13 votes in Congress required for any measure Delegates to Congress picked, paid for by state legislature
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4/19/10 Constitutional Convention State Constitutions PA° most democratic, but trampled minority rights- government was too strong MA° less democratic, but government was too weak (Shays Rebellion” brought fear that states about to collapse from internal dissention)
Image of page 6
4/19/10 Constitutional Convention The Framers Attending: men of practical affairs, including Continental army veterans and members of the Congress of the Articles of Confederation Absent: Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry An entirely new constitution was written, although the gathering was authorized only to revise Articles
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4/19/10 Virginia Plan Strong national government organized into 3 branches Bicameral legislature Executive and members of the National Judiciary were chosen by legislature Council of revision (select few of executives and legislatures) with veto power; legislature could
Image of page 8
4/19/10 New Jersey Plan Generated from a fear that legislative representation would be based on population, allowing the more populated states to always out vote the less populated states Sought to amend rather than replace the Articles of Confederation Proposed 1 vote per state, so Congress would be the creature of
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4/19/10 The Great (CT) Compromise House of Representatives based on population and directly elected by people Senate composed of 2 members per state and elected by state legislatures Reconciled interests of large and small states—the former dominated in the House of Representatives, the
Image of page 10
Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/19/10 Constitution and Democracy
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4/19/10 DID THE CONSTITUTION CREATE A DEMOCRACY? WAS IT INTENDED TO CREATE A
Image of page 12
4/19/10 HOW CAN ONE DEVISE A GOVERNMENT STRONG ENOUGH TO PRESERVE ORDER BUT NOT SO STRONG THAT IT WOULD THREATEN LIBERTY???
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern