#2,#3 SV -- Chpt. 22 pages 673-687

#2,#3 SV -- Chpt. 22 pages 673-687 - GeorgiaTechsdefinition...

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Georgia Tech’s definition The GT Student Policy on Sexual Harassment and Misconduct defines “sexual misconduct” as “sexual contact without consent by an acquaintance [boyfriend/classmate/etc] or a stranger” “It is a violation of this policy to engage in any form of sexual activity or conduct without the consent of the other person.” “Such consent may be withdrawn at any time , without regard to activity preceding the withdrawal of consent.”
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Defining lack of consent According to Georgia Tech’s policy, to constitute a lack of  consent, the acts must be committed either by: Threat Force Surprise Intimidation Or as a result of the victim’s mental or physical  impairment of which the accused was aware or should  have been aware What does this mean? How might someone be mentally or physically impaired?
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Continuum of Coercion Verbal pressure Lies Emotional threats Physical Threats Use of alcohol or drugs to incapacitate Physical force
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Recap: Consent Each person is equally free to act (not impaired in any way) Person gives verbal permission (silence does not equal consent) Responsibility to obtain consent lies with the person who initiates the sexual activity. Consent to some sexual activity is not consent to all sexual activity. Consent may be withdrawn at any time.
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Sexual Violence Statistics Among college students nationwide, between 20% and 25% of women have experienced completed or attempted rape 1 In 8-out-of-10 rape cases, the victim knows the perpetrator 2 Women are more likely to be victims than men -- 78% of are women, 22% are men 2 A national survey found that 34% of women were victims of sexual coercion by a husband or intimate partner in their lifetime 3 1 Fisher BS, Cullen FT, Turner MG. The sexual victimization of college women. Washington: Department of Justice (US), National Institute of  Justice; 2000. Publication No. NCJ 182369.  2 Tjaden P, Thoennes N. Full report of the prevalence, incidence, and consequences of violence against women: findings from the national violence  against women survey. Washington: National Institute of Justice; 2000. Report NCJ 183781.  3 Basile KC. Prevalence of wife rape and other intimate partner sexual coercion in a nationally representative sample of women.  Violence and  Victims  2002;17(5):511-24.
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What is sexual violence? Violence is an issue of POWER Typically used by members of a more powerful group over a less powerful group This power can take many forms: Physical power (strength or use of weapons) Psychological power Financial power Legal/Government-supported power In incidents of sexual violence there is always a power imbalance.
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and Control Wheel PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EMOTIONAL ABUSE Putting your partner down,  stalking, mind games,  telling ‘secrets’  to others, ignoring or silent 
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#2,#3 SV -- Chpt. 22 pages 673-687 - GeorgiaTechsdefinition...

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