preport-comments(2) - Engineering a Module-Based Digital...

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Engineering a Module-Based Digital Pattern Generator on the UP3 Education Board Ben Blount Timothy Gurtler Julienne Kung Kevin Morgan ECE 2031 Section L07 8 December 2008
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Executive Summary Digital hardware creation requires many steps to grow from an initial conception to a final product. One of the most critical phases of this process is verification, whereby a design or newly manufactured piece of hardware must be verified against a specific set of stimuli to ensure proper operation. The tool often employed to accomplish this is a digital pattern generator (DPG). This report addresses a DPG implementation intended for general-purpose use in a lab or production environment. To accomplish this goal, a custom, module-based architecture was created to allow flexibility in implementing the device and to provide a strong base for implementing longer-term goals. The architecture consists of three sections: control hardware, pattern generators, and user interface. The control hardware provides several parallel state machines for controlling the overall operation of the device. The pattern generators generate ten different patterns including up and down counting patterns, pseudo-random patterns, gray code pattern, binary coded decimal (up counter) pattern, strobing patterns, Fibonacci patterns, up and down shifting patterns, and user-defined patterns. The user interface uses a PS/ 2 keyboard and VGA display to increase usability of the device. Alongside these modules internal to the DPG, a PC based tool-chain was developed to facilitate the creation and downloading of the user-defined patterns. The DPG was very successful in its demonstration, only succumbing to minor inconsistencies in the user interface’s operation. As a result, the project was successful in reaching its design goals of implementing a flexible, all-purpose DPG. 1
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Introduction Digital hardware requires careful testing to ensure correct operation. As it is inefficient to do this manually, a digital pattern generator (DPG) is often employed to automate the process. The objective of this project was to develop a DPG that operates on a UP3 Education Board and would be potentially suitable for industrial or commercial applications. The DPG had to conform to the following constraints: Works equally well on a UP3-C6 or UP3-C12 board Requires only the following hardware: o A power supply o A PC for programming, downloading, and controlling the DPG o An on-board LCD or external VGA display o PS/2 Keyboard or Mouse o Serial or USB cables Provide all outputs on J1, J2, or J3 The proposed DPG (see Appendix A for proposal) met these constraints by employing a custom, module-based architecture employing several state machines operating in parallel as opposed to a readily available computer like SCOMP. This design allowed easy integration of different pattern types, a user interface employing a PS/2 keyboard and VGA display, and a PC based set of tools for designing and transferring user-defined patterns. The final implementation conformed to most of these proposed
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2010 for the course ECE 2040 taught by Professor Yili during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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preport-comments(2) - Engineering a Module-Based Digital...

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