chapter_3_summary - Chapter 3 Culture Culture ● Culture...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 3 Culture Culture ● Culture is a system involving behaviour, beliefs, knowledge, practices, values, and material such as buildings, tools, and sacred items • However, culture is contested • There is not total agreement as to what constitutes a culture even by those who belong to the group • One of the points of contestation is authenticity • Authenticity refers to the following of traditional practices • However, culture is dynamic. Traditional practices become altered as a culture changes Dominant Culture vs Subculture and Counterculture ● Dominant Culture • The culture that through its political and economic power is able to impose its values, language, and ways of behaving and interpreting behaviour on a given society • Canada’s dominant culture: English- speaking, white, heterosexual male university graduate of European background between the ages of 25-55, in good health, who owns a home in a middle-class neighbourhood in Ontario or Quebec. ● Subculture • A group of people who share a distinctive set of cultural beliefs and behaviours that differ in some significant way, but are not opposed to, that of the dominant culture • For example, groups organized around occupations or hobbies ● Countercultures • Groups that reject selected elements of the dominant culture (e.g. clothing styles or sexual norms) • Examples of countercultures would include hippies, biker gangs, and Goths High Culture vs Popular Culture and Mass Culture ● High culture...
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2010 for the course SOCI Soci203 taught by Professor Ingrid during the Spring '10 term at Concordia Canada.

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chapter_3_summary - Chapter 3 Culture Culture ● Culture...

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