chapter_8_summary - Chapter 8 Social Inequality:...

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Chapter 8 Social Inequality: Stratification
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Social inequality is the long-term existence of significant differences in access to goods and services among social groups (e.g., class, ethnicity, gender)
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Class and Social Stratification The main term used to talk about social inequality is class Karl Marx (1988) described class as being relational in that it reflects one’s relation to the means of production The owners of production Marx referred to as the bourgeoisie The workers were referred to as the proletariat
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Sub-classes Marx identified other sub-classes in his work: Petty bourgeoisie : made up of the small business people Lumpenproletariat : small-time criminals, beggars, unemployed
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Class as a Social Identity Class in Marx’s view would have an organic identity , a shared sense of common membership and purpose Part of this identity would include a class consciousness An awareness of what is in the best interests of one’s class Marx believed that the bourgeoisie possessed class consciousness
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False consciousness : the idea that something is in one’s best interests when in fact it is not Marx believed that the workers had false consciousness He cited organized religion as an example when he wrote ‘Religion is the opiate of the masses’
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Problem’s with Marx’s Perspective It is difficult apply Marx’s class paradigm to places like Canada today People do not fit well in to the old scheme For example we have workers with extremely
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2010 for the course SOCI Soci203 taught by Professor Ingrid during the Spring '10 term at Concordia Canada.

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chapter_8_summary - Chapter 8 Social Inequality:...

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