chapter_9_summary - Chapter 9 Race And Ethnicity Sites of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 9 ‘Race’ And Ethnicity: Sites of Inequality
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Introduction to ‘Race’ As biological entities, races do not exist Racialization does exist It is the process in which people are viewed and judged essentially different in terms of their intellect, their morality, their values, and their worth because of differences of physical type or cultural heritage
Background image of page 2
A Sociological Profile of Canada’s Native People Canada’s native people have been racialized Non-native people have lived in Canada for only 3.3 per cent of its history yet native history is largely ignored Native people tend to be studied from the perspective of social problems
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Aboriginal voices have been barely heard in the sociological study of their people Aboriginal people are defined by a complex system of legal status that separates them from non-aboriginals and each other
Background image of page 4
Native Status Legal differences in status come from the Indian Act (1876) and are administered by the federal Department of Indian Affairs The main designations are: Registered Indian, Bill C-31 Indian, Band member, Reserve resident, Treaty Indian, Métis, and Eskimo
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Two Recent Changes in Aboriginal Canada 1. The Powley Test (2003) Used to determine whether Native and Métis people can hunt without a license According to the test, one must be able to show that they have been identified as Métis or Native and that they are an accepted member of the community
Background image of page 6
2. Urban reserves – lands located in an urban area – which allow for Aboriginal business
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Blacks in Canada Black communities have existed in Nova
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/19/2010 for the course SOCI Soci203 taught by Professor Ingrid during the Spring '10 term at Concordia Canada.

Page1 / 25

chapter_9_summary - Chapter 9 Race And Ethnicity Sites of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online