L2_Colonial%20Roots

L2_Colonial%20Roots - 4/1/2010 The Scientific and Colonial...

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4/1/2010 1 The Scientific and Colonial Roots of Development ARE/ECN 115A April 1, 2010 Business For Tuesday PRL Chs 2 & 3 (skim) PRL Ch4, pp 103 – 116 (Harrod-Domar growth model) Easterly Ch2 (“Aid for investment”) Clarification No “clickers” required; Questions?
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4/1/2010 2 Summary of Last Time: Critical Thinking about “Development” Diverse definitions and uses within social sciences Level of y (income per capita); Mt il l l bi f id iid l ( f d hl t jb ) Material well being of individuals (food, shelter, jobs, wages, …); Expansion of individual choice (income & political participation); Fulfillment of human “potential” (education, human rights). Tradeoffs in choice of definition y is the most commonly used measuring stick of development. Advantages: The definition is clear, “objective”, and measurable. Strong correlation with many material measures Strong correlation with many material measures. Disadvantages: The definition is very narrow; Correlations don’t imply causality (i.e., y need not cause material well being); Implies “continuum” whereby richer countries are somehow better. Alternatives? Moving beyond y has many of its own problems Measurability? (have you realized your “human potential”?) Subjectivity (conflicts over which rights are “basic”) Outline for Today No doubt that today y is dominant definition of de elopmen development. When and why did this happen? (Post WWII will be critical moment) Part I: Scientific roots of development Part II: Colonial roots of development
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4/1/2010 3 Part I. The Scientific Roots of Development Goal: We’re going to end up in 1949, right after WW WWII Why focus on history? Isn’t this an econ class? “Brave New World” at end of WW II. End of colonialism Post War Period End of colonialism; Rethinking of beliefs underlying colonialism; Confronted with global heterogeneity including vastly different material conditions of life. How did people (Western leaders) develop expectations for social transformation (i e development) for social transformation (i.e., development)? Use the familiar to grapple with the unknown. Draw on analogy from the natural world where development already has meanings associated with “potential” and “growth”
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4/1/2010 4 Development in Natural Science Three Key Components: Directionality Continuity/Cumulativeness Irreversibility Summary: There is some natural, given process through which an organism progresses to reach its full potential. There are no moral connotations (an under-developed tomato is not inferior to a developed tomato) Mid 19 th century “development” migrates from biolog to social science Migration of the term “Development” biology to social sciences Equated with the evolution of human societies Meant the distancing from ‘primitive’ or ‘uncivilized’ Industrialization became equated with the terminal stage – or goal – of human societies
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2010 for the course ECN 115A 115A taught by Professor Boucher during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

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L2_Colonial%20Roots - 4/1/2010 The Scientific and Colonial...

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