McMullen_exp10_Graded

McMullen_exp10_Graded - Experiment 10 Gas Laws Spring 2010...

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Experiment 10 – Gas Laws Spring 2010 Name Chelsea McMullen Lab Section 428 Point Summary (See Blackboard for detailed grading rubric) Superior Excellent Satisfactory Fair Poor Omitted Introduction •Purpose of Report 2 •Goals of Experiment 4 Materials and Methods 1 Results and Discussion •Description of data 5 •Data Tables 5 •Data Table Titles 4 •Graphs 5 •Figure Captions 5 •Sample Calculations 3 •Systematic Error 3 •Random Error 3 •Discussion of discrepancies 4 Other 5 Lab Technique 20 TOTAL POINTS 69 TA Comments/Suggestions:
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C HEMISTRY 102L R EPORT T EMPLATE EXPT. Experimenting with Gas Laws 10 10 Introduction The purpose of this report is to determine a mathematical relationship to describe three of the four fundamental physical properties of a gas: pressure, volume, and temperature . The objective of the experiment was to investigate how changes in temperature and volume would affect the pressure of a confined sample of air . Materials and Methods The procedure for this experiment was taken from Experiment 10 Lab Manual: Experimenting with Gas Laws . There were no deviations from the given procedure. Results and Discussion In Part I of the experiment, the relationship between the pressure and the volume of a gas is examined. Table 1 summarizes the raw data collected in this experiment. Table 1. Relationship Between Pressure(atm) and Volume (L) determined by using a syringe and pressure sensor. These data are plotted to determine the mathematical relationship between the pressure and volume of a confined gas. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the graphical analysis used to determine this mathematical relationship.
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Figure 1. Graphical analysis of pressure vs. volume data for trials 1 and 2. The trend of the data suggests an inverse relationship. Figure 2.
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2010 for the course CHEM 102L taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

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McMullen_exp10_Graded - Experiment 10 Gas Laws Spring 2010...

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