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SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT - MOTIVATION MOTIVATION The...

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MOTIVATION MOTIVATION “The willingness to exert high levels of effort to reach organizational goals , conditioned by the effort’s ability to satisfy some individual need
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The Motivation Process Unsatisfied Need Reduced Tension Tension Drives Search Behavior Satisfied Need
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SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT Experiments of F.W. Taylor (1911) Taylor believed that man was a perfect example of rational economic being who is capable of calculating actions which result in maximum self benefit. Taylor believed that Human Beings are driven primarily by two motives: (i) Fear of Hunger (ii) Search of Profits. Guided by these beliefs Taylor suggested that a person can be motivated to peak performance through material rewards and economic inducements.
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SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT Experiments of F.W. Taylor (1911) He applied this philosophy and advocated piece rated system of payment where rewards were closely linked to output. Taylor assumed that the complexities of Human Behavior could be explained away by financial incentives which would suffice to ensure motivation.
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SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT Experiments of F.W. Taylor (1911) Taylor believed that design the most efficient jobs and then plug in the employee who would do your bidding if the pay is right. However, Taylor’s theories resulted in increased alienation and hostility among employees as the work become repetitive and monotonous and employees regarded themselves as mere cogs in the machines resulting in large scale unhappiness.
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HUMAN RELATIONS MOVEMENT Hawthorne Experiment Elton Mayo(1927-32) The research was aimed at investigating an assumption of the Scientific Approach that physical working conditions influence worker output. To investigate this assumption the researchers, increased the level of illumination and, productivity increased. The researchers, then reduced the level of illumination, but to their surprise, Instead of output falling, it actually further increased.
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HUMAN RELATIONS MOVEMENT Hawthorne Experiment Elton Mayo(1927-32) The study suggested that non-economic rewards and social interaction play an important role in determining motivation and happiness of an employee. Earlier the workers were feeling alienated and degraded by oversimplified jobs, but their performance improved by making them feel important and members of a social group.
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HUMAN RELATIONS MOVEMENT Abraham Maslow’s Need Hierarchy (1943)
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HUMAN RELATIONS MOVEMENT Abraham Maslow’s Need Hierarchy (1943) OFF THE JOB NEED HIERARCHY ON THE JOB Education, religion, hobbies, personal growth Self- Actualization Needs Opportunities for training, advancement, growth and creativity Approval of family, friends, community Esteem Needs Recognition, high status,
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