Lab 12 - Part 2 Concentration effects and the Nernst equation In part 2 of this experiment we were asked to use different concentrations of Lead

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Discussion 12: Thermodynamics of Electrochemical Cells Part 1: Effect of Temperature on the Cell Potential In part 1 of this experiment we tested how temperature affects the cell potential. We measured the cell potential of the reaction Pb(s) + Cu2+(aq) à Pb2+(aq) + Cu(s) at various temperatures. We found that at room temperature the cell potential was approximately .5 V. As we increased the temperature of the water the cell potential increased. At 45C the cell potential was .511 V and at 70C the cell potential was .514V. When the temperature decreased to 16C the cell potential was .503 V and then at 10C the cell potential was .502 V. Our calculated values and our experimental values were slightly off from one another, but not significantly enough to account for any specific error. Possible sources of error could include undetected changes in temperature.
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Unformatted text preview: Part 2: Concentration effects and the Nernst equation. In part 2 of this experiment we were asked to use different concentrations of Lead nitrate and Copper nitrate to find the cell voltage through measurement and calulations. We used the reaction Pb(s) + Cu2+(aq) à Pb2+(aq) + Cu(s). We constructed an electro chemical cell using the same materials as in part 1. We changed the concentration of the lead solutions .1M Pb(NO3)2 for the first part and the copper solution to .1M Cu(NO3)2 for the second part. Our measured cell voltage for bothe solution at 1M was .505 V. For .1M Pb(NO3)2 and 1M Cu(NO3)2 the voltage was .525 V. And for the 1M Pb(NO3)2 and .1MCu(NO3)2 the voltage was .465 V. Our calculated voltages were .47 V, .499 V and . 44 V. These voltages were very accurate compared to our measured voltages so I do not see much error....
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2010 for the course CHEM 1A/ 1 Chem Lab taught by Professor Van koppen during the Spring '10 term at UCSB.

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