Manual4BL - Physics 4BL: Electricity and Magnetism Lab...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Physics 4BL: Electricity and Magnetism Lab manual UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy This manual is adapted from the work of R.L. Stenzel written by J.A. Wright and S.E. Brown, last updated November 18, 2009 1 Contents Introduction 3 I Laboratory 1: Uncertainty and statistics 4 II Laboratory 2: DC and AC circuits 13 III Laboratory 3: Magnetism 29 IVLaboratory 4: Speed of Sound and Light 42 V Laboratory 5: Geometric Optics 53 VILaboratory 6: diffraction and interference 63 Appendix: Data Acquisition 75 Appendix: Power Supply 77 Appendix: Linear Regression 79 2 Introduction The objective of this course is to teach electricity and magnetism (E&M) by observations from experiments. This approach complements the classroom experience of Physics 1B,C where you learn the material from lectures and books designed to teach problem solving skills. Historically, E&M evolved from many observations that called for a theoretical explanation. It is a great achievement that all classical E&M phenomena can be explained by four equations, the so-called Maxwells equations. This laboratory course is designed to perform experiments showing the validity of these equations. In the laboratory, you will have different experiences than in the classroom. In the real world, there are no point sources, no infinities, all measurements have errors, and sometimes things dont work out as expected. A broken instrument or wire can be as frustrating and time consuming as trying to solve a seemingly impossible homework problem. You will have to learn patience and persistence to make good measurements. For solving theoretical problems you first need to learn the appropriate mathematical tools. For performing experiments you first need to become familiar with measurement tools, called instru- ments. These include multimeters, oscilloscopes, signal generators, a Gaussmeter, digital scale, power supplies and computers. The first lab session is devoted to acquaint you with modern digital data acquisition methods. It is expected that you are already familiar with Personal Computers (PCs) and basic software such as spreadsheets. In the lab you will record your data to file, copy the files on memory sticks or CDs and evaluate the results at home or a computer lab. For each experiment you are supposed to write a laboratory report. It should contain a very brief description of your experiment (no need to copy the lab manual), the data obtained (usually in the form of graphs) and evaluations such as line, surface and volume integrals, curve fitting, circuit analysis, and any questions raised in the lab manual. The report should be written concisely in a scientific language; it is not an essay where you admire the beauty of science or express your frustrations with the equipment. The TA has no time to read excessively long lab reports. He/she will only look for correct answers and understanding of the results. The reports are due a week after the experiments have been done. Data are shared within an experimental team but the reportsthe experiments have been done....
View Full Document

Page1 / 80

Manual4BL - Physics 4BL: Electricity and Magnetism Lab...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online