Hebrew Bible 17 - Hebrew Bible Lecture o Why is Isaiah so...

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Hebrew Bible Lecture o Why is Isaiah so hard to read? o History: the book of Isaiah is a deeply political text and is talking about the current events, however, he does not stop to explain what those issues are (because back then, everyone already knew the current events), leaving today’s readers unsure of what exact events he is talking about. o Syro-Ephraimite crisis: read about 730s BCE in which the Syrian kingdom worked together with Ephraim against the kingdom of Judah (king Ahaz). They wanted to get Judah’s help, but since they refused, they wanted to attack them and place a new king that would go to war with them against Assyria. o Ahaz had considered sided with Assyrians and asks them for help when Syria and Ephraim attacked them. o Isaiah thought this was a terrible idea and predicts that Jerusalem will be conquered regardless of Assyria’s help. o 705-701 BCE Assyria attacks Judah (now Judah is anti-Assyria). However, does not destroy Jerusalem. o In both cases, Jerusalem surrounded, however, not overtaken. o We often don’t know which prophecy talks about which event. o Prophetic literature often doesn’t tell us when a text begins and ends. o
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2010 for the course RELIGION 220 taught by Professor Sarbacker during the Winter '08 term at Northwestern.

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Hebrew Bible 17 - Hebrew Bible Lecture o Why is Isaiah so...

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