Mythology Notes - Mythology Lecture 2 January 10, 2008 o...

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Mythology Lecture 2 January 10, 2008 o Recall: distinction between myth and folktale is blurry but with myths, speakers and audience understand that something important is being said/learned from it (some phenomenon?) o Today: In what circumstances where these myths told, what kind of speakers and audience were engaged in these myths (culture of the Ancient Greeks). o A myth is a sum of all the versions that have been told. Therefore, there is not one correct version. Each version tells you a little something about that context in which it was told. o There were some writers who generally had more authority in myth telling (ex. Homer) o This does not mean that others could not change the story/playing with it (ex. O Brother Where Art Thou) o One aspect of myth is that it has to do with something universal and another is that it has to do with something specific. o Universal: a myth can travel in time, space (different parts of the world). Myths travel to different parts (traders, etc) and the people of those lands take the basic
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Mythology Notes - Mythology Lecture 2 January 10, 2008 o...

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