Lab Report number 1, final - Bio 100-73 Professor Rogers...

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Bio 100-73 Professor Rogers Due: 10/15/09 Rotting Log & Soil Organism
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1. Introduction When a tree collapses to the ground, it turns into a home for many organisms. These organisms, called decomposers, contribute to recycling in the nature environement. These decomposers use the fallen log as a source of food and shelter until the log is no longer beneficial to these organisms. The decomposing process starts with various types of bacteria and fungi collecting on the log which softens the tissues. After the tissues are softened, other insects begin to burrow in the log creating holes for natural elements, like moisture and heat, to also assist in decay of the log. Once the log is at this stage, it has the suitable living conditions for soil organisms. Soil organism diversity is dependant on the surroundings of the particular log. Once the decomposing process begins, insect diversity may increase both on the outside and inside of the log. Insect diversity is having a variety of insects found present in an area. It is important because each organism plays an important role in the forest and recycling logs. The biological concept that this lab is addressing is insect diversity in decaying logs. The different stages that a decaying log encounters, has different organisms present at the given stages. That is because each organism plays a different part in the decaying process and once that organism contributes to the decaying process it has done its job. The hypothesis that is addressed in this lab is insect diversity is effected by the decay class of the logs. Based off the hypothesis, rotting log that is disected, will have a variety of insect because of the decay class. The soil was slightly moist with a few rocks. There was a fair amoung of foilage due to canepy. The canepy also contributed
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to the amount of light that was present when the log was collected. The current tempature was approximatly 22.5 degrees Celcius. All of these factors contribute to the insect diversity for the log. 2.
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2010 for the course BIO 0000 taught by Professor Professorrogers during the Spring '10 term at Western State Colorado University .

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Lab Report number 1, final - Bio 100-73 Professor Rogers...

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