Class02_Premodern_Economy_Lectures_1_and_2

Class02_Premodern_Economy_Lectures_1_and_2 - 2010-04-12 2....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2010-04-12 1 2. 2. Population and Economy in Population and Economy in Pre Pre-Modern Societies Modern Societies Topics 1. The Malthusian Economy 2. The Medieval Agrarian Economy 3. City, Commerce, and Industry 2. Population and Economy in Pre-Modern Societies (1): The Mathusian Economy Issues 1. Long-term, continuous growth had not started until the 18 th century: Standards of living stagnated for a long period of time. 2 How to explain this stagnant pe modern 2. How to explain this stagnant, per-modern economy? Æ Malthusian Equilibrium 3. The actual functioning of the Malthusian economy
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2010-04-12 2 Economic Growth Prior to Industrial Revolution ± The data are scanty for earlier period, but the existing evidence suggests that the standards of living of Europeans in the 18 th century were no better than century were no better than those of the hunting and gathering society ± Some pieces of evidence 1) Skeleton remains 2) Population and Mortality 3) Wages and consumption Long-Term Changes in Standards of Living in Pre-Modern Era The Backbone of History About 12 000 skeletons of people who lived in the ± About 12,000 skeletons of people who lived in the Western Hemisphere from 6000 B.C. to the 19 th century had been collected and analyzed. ± 10 indices of health condition were measured, and a composite index of health was computed Æ It is determined by nutritional status, level of stress at growing ages disease and violence growing ages, disease, and violence. ± Based on the composite index, the following is analyzed: 1) Long-term trend in health 2) The relationship between health and ecological environment
Background image of page 2
2010-04-12 3 Health and Nutrition in the Western Hemisphere: Collaborators and Localities of Burial Sites Skeletal Measures of Health Individual Identification ¾ Age ¾ Sex Height Dental Hypoplasia •“ Anemia ¾ Cribra Orbitalia ¾ Porotic Hyperostosis Dental Decay ¾ Carious Lesions ¾ Abscesses ¾ Ante-Mortem Tooth Loss Arthritis Infection Trauma Specific Diseases
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2010-04-12 4 Components Affected by Ecological Variables* Category Components 300+ meters stature, hyp., anemia, inf., DJD Dispersed or village stature, DJD Town or urban stature, hyp., anemia, inf., DJD, trauma (+) Open forest-grassland hyp., anemia, inf., Domesticates hyp., anemia, dental, inf., DJD Coastal hyp. (+), dental (+), inf. (+), DJD (+)
Background image of page 4
2010-04-12 5 Major Results from the Project on The Backbone of History ± The index of health in the New World began to decline long before Columbus arrived. ± Declining health condition was perhaps related to settlement in arable lands, spread of agriculture, emergence of the ruling class (government), and urbanization. ± The effects of settlement and agriculture: 1) Transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture: why? 2) Lower labor productivity in agriculture 3) The quality of diets declined (meat Æ grain) 4) Increase in socioeconomic inequality.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/21/2010 for the course ECON 181B taught by Professor Lee during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

Page1 / 46

Class02_Premodern_Economy_Lectures_1_and_2 - 2010-04-12 2....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online