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12_Nonwovens-1 - Nonwovens Lesson 12 Oct 4 2007 Nonwovens...

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Nonwovens Lesson 12 Oct 4, 2007
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Nonwovens – Non-conventional fabric structures Typical applications: Wipes & towels Hygiene products Diapers Modern machine makes 1000 diapers/min! Disposable lab coats Adult incontinence pads (adult diapers) Insulation Interlinings Carpet components Geotextiles Roofing Hospital pads & gowns Disposable surgical gowns Filters
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Characteristics of Manufacture Fast Inexpensive Functional (or “ engineered ”) Produced from extruded filaments or fibrous webs Bonded by some mechanism.
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Held together via “Bonds” Adhesive (glue) Mechanical interlocking Needling with barbed needles Fluid jet (water jet) Thermal (partial melting) Requires thermoplastic fibers Stitch bonding Chain stitch Tricot (or ½ tricot) stitch
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Nonwoven Fabric Classifications Staple Fiber Web (or Batt) Thick webs are usually called batts Spunbonded fabrics Spunlaced or hydroentangled Stitch-bonded
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Staple Fiber Web (Batt) Classifications Needle Punched fabrics Entanglement by the action of forcing barbed needles into and out of the web or batt
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Spunlaced (Hydroentangled) Same as needlepunched except Use high pressure water jets Like pressure washing the fiber web Fibers entangled with high velocity water jets Spunlaced Usually use polyester fibers Hydroentangled Can use almost any type of fiber
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Wet-laid fabrics Uses paper-making process Natural or synthetic fibers Slurried in water Deposit randomly on screen (water drains away leaving fiber mat) Squeeze to remove excess water Dried Often include water based adhesive In slurry water to bond fibers & provide strength Drip or print on in a later step
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Dry-laid Fabrics: Instead of water, use air turbulence to suspend and deposit fibers randomly on screen to form a batt or web Or, use a carded web of parallel fibers to form a batt or web (all fibers in same direction) Bond fibers together Adhesive (Partial) Melting of thermoplastic fibers (thermal bonding)
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