12_Nonwovens-1

12_Nonwovens-1 - Nonwovens Lesson 12 Oct 4, 2007 Nonwovens...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nonwovens Lesson 12 Oct 4, 2007
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Nonwovens – Non-conventional fabric structures Typical applications: Hygiene products Diapers Modern machine makes 1000 diapers/min! Disposable lab coats Adult incontinence pads (adult diapers) Insulation Interlinings Carpet components Geotextiles Roofing Disposable surgical gowns Filters
Background image of page 2
Characteristics of Manufacture Fast Inexpensive Functional (or “ engineered ”) Produced from extruded filaments or fibrous webs Bonded by some mechanism.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Held together via “Bonds” Adhesive (glue) Mechanical interlocking Needling with barbed needles Fluid jet (water jet) Thermal (partial melting) Requires thermoplastic fibers Stitch bonding Chain stitch Tricot (or ½ tricot) stitch
Background image of page 4
Nonwoven Fabric Classifications Staple Fiber Web (or Batt) Thick webs are usually called batts Spunbonded fabrics Spunlaced or hydroentangled Stitch-bonded
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Staple Fiber Web (Batt) Classifications Needle Punched fabrics Entanglement by the action of forcing barbed needles into and out of the web or batt
Background image of page 6
Spunlaced (Hydroentangled) Same as needlepunched except Use high pressure water jets Like pressure washing the fiber web Fibers entangled with high velocity water jets Spunlaced Usually use polyester fibers Hydroentangled Can use almost any type of fiber
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Wet-laid fabrics Uses paper-making process Natural or synthetic fibers Slurried in water Deposit randomly on screen (water drains away leaving fiber mat) Squeeze to remove excess water Dried Often include water based adhesive Drip or print on in a later step
Background image of page 8
Instead of water, use air turbulence to suspend and deposit fibers randomly on screen to form a batt or web Or, use a carded web of parallel fibers to form a batt or web (all fibers in same direction)
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course TT 105 taught by Professor Michielsen during the Fall '08 term at N.C. State.

Page1 / 37

12_Nonwovens-1 - Nonwovens Lesson 12 Oct 4, 2007 Nonwovens...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online