GEOG101_-_Lecture_02

GEOG101_-_Lecture_02 - Lecture2: FundamentalConcepts...

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Lecture 2: Fundamental Concepts January 7, 2010 GEOG 101
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Lecture Outline Review of What is Human Geography Fundamental Concepts Why is Geography important
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The Study of Geography Geography The study of Earth as created by natural forces and  as modified by human action.
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Studying Human Geography Physical Geography Physical geography deals with Earth’s natural processes and  their outcomes. Human Geography Human geography deals with the spatial organization of human  activity and with people’s relationships with their environments. Regional Geography Regional geography is the study of the ways in which unique  combinations of environmental and human factors produce  territories with distinctive landscapes and cultural attributes.
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Basic Tools of Geography Observation Visualization / Representation Analysis Modelling
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Fundamental Concepts of  Geography Region Location Distance Space Place Accessibility Spatial interaction Scale
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Regions The concept of the “region” is used to distinguish  one area from another. Regions are distinguished on the basis of specific  characteristics, or attributes.
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Regions minimize the variation of the chosen  attribute within their boundaries and maximize the  variation of that attribute between themselves and  their neighbouring regions. Regions can be defined on the basis of any 
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2010 for the course ARTS GEOG101 taught by Professor Geofferyshifflet during the Spring '10 term at Waterloo.

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GEOG101_-_Lecture_02 - Lecture2: FundamentalConcepts...

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