GEOG101_-_Lecture_18

GEOG101_-_Lecture_18 - Chapter10 UrbanizationPart2 GEOG101...

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Chapter 10 Urbanization Part 2 GEOG 101 Lecture 18 March 18th 2010
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Lecture Outline Urban Systems Central Places and Locational Hierarchies Urban Growth Processes Urbanization and Economic Development Deindustrialization and Decentralization Counterurbanization The Unintended Metropolis
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Test #2 Feedback Session Tuesday March 23 10:00am to Noon in EV1 107
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World Urbanization Today The current rate of urbanization is hard to determine Occurring under chaotic conditions Different definitions of what urban actually means Urbanization is a ‘relative’ phenomenon. United Nations estimates that 50% of the world’s population is  now urban. In comparison North America is around 80% urbanized. Africa and Asia are less than 40% urban. Regional Trends and Projections Trends and projections reflect differences between the core,  peripheral and semi-peripheral regions Core has been urbanized for some time.  More periphery  regions are rapidly urbanizing 
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World Urbanization Today: Major World Regions, 2003
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World Urbanization Today: Urban Population Growth, 1950–2030
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World’s 10 Largest Metropolitan Areas, Ranked by  Population Size, 1950, 1980, and 2010  (in millions)
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Urban Systems Every town and city is part of an  interlocking urban system  that links regional, national, and international-scale human  geographies in a complex web of interdependence. Urban systems organize space through hierarchies of cities of  different sizes and functions. Hierarchal urban systems share many commonalities. Notably the relative size and spacing of individual towns and cities 
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Urban Systems Central places Settlements in which certain products and services are  available to consumers. Again, organized in hierarchal systems Central place theory A theory that seeks to explain the relative size and spacing of  towns and cities as a function of people's shopping behaviors. Developed by Christaller in the 1930s. Part of the locational analysis tradition of geography which also  includes Weber’s theory of industrial location and Von Thunen’s  theory of agricultural location. 
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Central Places and Locational Hierarchies
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Central Place Theory Christaller, developed the central place theory in Southern  Germany, after noticing how the number of small centers of activity  in the area were arranged in a relatively organized pattern. Generally small places offering a limited number of services are 
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2010 for the course ARTS GEOG101 taught by Professor Geofferyshifflet during the Spring '10 term at Waterloo.

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GEOG101_-_Lecture_18 - Chapter10 UrbanizationPart2 GEOG101...

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