KIN 3513- TEST 3

KIN 3513- TEST 3 - Attention as a Limited Capacity Resource...

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Attention as a Limited Capacity Resource I. Attention and Multiple Task Performance a. Attention refers to characteristics associated with i. Consciousness ii. Awareness iii. Cognitive effort b. Performance of Skills and Limitations i. Simultaneous performance of Multiple Skills ii. Detection of Relevant Information in the Environment iii. Ignoring Irrelevant Information in the Environment II. Attention and Multiple Task Performance a. Performing simultaneously more than one task i. No measurable detrimental effects ii. Deteriorated task performance 1. Question why sometimes detrimental effects and other times no effects a. Possible answer relates to attention as a performance limiting factor. III. Attention Theories a. Filter theories (a.k.a. bottleneck theories) i. Stimuli resulting in response(s) are processed serially. 1. A filter in one of the stages of processing results in limitation on multiple task performance. 2. Theories differ in the location of the filter. IV. Attention Theories a. Resource Capacity Theories i. There are limited resources which limit performance of multiple tasks 1. If resource capacity limits are not exceeded performance of multiple tasks can occur.
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2. If resource capacity limits are exceeded performance deteriorates on one or more tasks V. Attention Theories a. Central Resource Capacity Theories i. One central attention resource (i.e., CNS) ii. Activity requires attention iii. Activities compete for the demanded resources to perform optimally iv. Resource is flexible (so the resource can be used in different activities) 1. VI. Kahneman’s Attention Theory a. Is an example of a Central Resource Capacity Theory i. There is one attention capacity resource ii. Attention capacity limits are flexible iii. Attention resources are not constraint to one task iv. Equates attention to “cognitive effort” VII. Kahneman’s Attention Theory a. Arousal level i. The factor that influences the amount of attention capacity for a specific performance situation 1. The amount of attention resources available varies in relation to a person’s arousal level 2. Maximum amount of resources only available when arousal level is optimal for the situation a. Inverted U-relation between performance and arousal (the Yerkes-Dodson law).
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b. VIII. Kahneman’s Attention Theory a. Arousal level i. Simple tasks ii. Complex tasks b. IX. Kahneman’s Attention Theory a. Evaluation of attention requirements of multiple tasks to be performed i. Critical to determine whether sufficient attention resources are available ii. Arousal level determines the capacity limits X. Arousal-Performance Relationship a. Picture in powerpoint XI. Kahneman’s Attention Theory a. Three “rules” individuals use to prioritize available attention resources when performing multiple tasks i. Ensure completion of at least one task ii. Enduring disposition: Involuntary attention allocation 1. Novelty of the situation
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2. Meaningfulness of the event iii. Momentary intentions
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2010 for the course KIN 3513 taught by Professor Porter during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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KIN 3513- TEST 3 - Attention as a Limited Capacity Resource...

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