TechNote4.Build.Access.Table

TechNote4.Build.Access.Table - If we choose the list of...

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Building Access Tables The heart of any Access application is the table (or tables) that hold the data. A lot of thought has gone into theories surrounding good table design. Some of that is explained in Chapter 5. This tech note, however is just intended to go through the mechanics of building a table. Suppose we are going to create a database concerning our collection of model railroad cars. A table is a member in a database, so step 1 is to create an empty database: Select File; Then choose “Blank Database” from the menu at the right. A window opens, and you give your database a name (like RRColl.mdb). Now we have an empty database. Next we will want to create one or more tables. Like most Microsoft applications, Access has a wizard that can be quite helpful. We will use the wizard to help create this database.
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The wizard has a number or “templates” for different database needs.
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Unformatted text preview: If we choose the list of Personal templates, it turns out that household inventory has a set of field names that will work out well for our model train collection. We can use the arrows to choose the fields that seem to apply. If we want to have a field that is not there, we can choose something similar, and then rename the field. In our case, HouseholdInvId is not quite right, so we will rename it the be TrainCarID: You finish up the table design by giving it a name. There are several options for entering data into the table. The simplest option is to enter the data directly into the table rows. In the image below, I have entered two of the railroad cars into my collection database: Obviously, a database can be much more complex than this. Frequently it will take multiple tables, and those tables will require linking. But that is for a later Tech Note!...
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TechNote4.Build.Access.Table - If we choose the list of...

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