Chapter 7 - Chapter7:TheSolarSystemanditsExploration

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 7: The Solar System and its Exploration Sun with planets and some of the dwarf planets of the solar system.  Sizes may be roughly to  scale, but not the distances.  Our ancestors long ago recognized the motions of the planets through the sky, but it has been  only a few hundred years since we learned that we are part of a solar system centered on the  Sun. Even then, we knew little about the other planets until the advent of large telescopes. More  recently, our understanding of other worlds has exploded with the dawn of space exploration.  We've lived in this solar system all along, but only now are we getting to know it.  In this chapter, we'll explore our solar system like newcomers to the neighborhood. We'll first look  at the broad patterns we observe in the solar system and the general characteristics of the  objects within it. We'll then take a brief tour of the individual worlds, starting from the Sun and  moving outward through the planets. Finally, we'll discuss the use of spacecraft to explore the  solar system, examining how we are coming to learn so much more about our neighbors. Layout and Structure  Layout
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Solar System or solar system comprises the Sun and the retinue of celestial objects  gravitationally bound to it: the eight planets, their known moons, three currently identified dwarf  planets and their four known moons, and thousands of small bodies. This last category includes  asteroids, meteoroids, comets, and interplanetary dust.  In order of their distances from the Sun,  the planets are Mercury Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Six of the  eight planets are in turn orbited by natural satellites (usually termed "moons" after Earth's Moon)  and every planet past the asteroid belt is encircled by planetary rings of dust and other particles.  The planets other than Earth are named after gods and goddesses from Greco-Roman  mythology.   The planets all have nearly circular orbits and all orbit counterclockwise around the  Sun (from the vantage point of looking down on the North Pole of the Earth).  In fact, large moons  also generally orbit their host planets in the CCW direction.  The planets also lie very near the  ecliptic plane, the plane defined by the Earth's orbit around the Sun.  The axes of rotation of the  planets is roughly perpendicular to the plane of their motion (diagrams below).
Background image of page 2
From 1930 to 2006, Pluto, the largest known Kuiper belt object, was considered the Solar  System's ninth planet. However, in 2006 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) created an 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 38

Chapter 7 - Chapter7:TheSolarSystemanditsExploration

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online