Nattier--essay - Chinese 140 Sicong Ma A Chinese TextIs...

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Chinese 140 Sicong Ma A Chinese Text—Is this the Conclusion? --Response to Jan Nattier’s article on Heart Sutra In her article about the origin of the popular Buddhism text, the Heart Sutra, Jan Nattier gives out a very plausible conclusion with the existing clues, that the Heart Sutra is actually a Chinese text: first appeared in China and then translated into Sanskrit by Hsuan-tsang or his followers. The reasons Nattier gives out are clear, and we can conclude them into three main aspects. First of all, the wordings in the the Large Sutra (the one of which the Heart Sutra is considered to be a summary) and that in the Heart Sutra, though similar in meanings, do not match each other quite precisely in the Sanskrit versions, while the two both match quite precisely (some places a word-by-word agreement) with the text in Chinese, which strongly indicates that the Sanskrit version of the Heart Sutra is a back-translation from Chinese (the Chinese version plays the role of an intermediate
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2010 for the course CHINESE 150 taught by Professor Robert during the Spring '09 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Nattier--essay - Chinese 140 Sicong Ma A Chinese TextIs...

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