Homework 7 - The Effect of Similarity 1 Running head: THE...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Effect of Similarity 1 Running head: THE EFFECT OF SIMILARITY The Effect of Similarity on Reaction Time and Error Rates by College Students Stephanie Leath Wayne State University Department of Psychology
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Effect of Similarity 2 Abstract The theory of object recognition investigates how two-dimensional objects are processed in the brain. It shows how figures are broken down into distinctive features, or smaller pieces of the whole object, and how the brain uses specific neurons to interpret and determine what the object is. A group of 42 participants, consisting of 12 males and 32 females, were tested using a feature analysis program to test how fast and accurate they were to determine if a letter pair was similar or different using several different examples of letter pairs such as, EF, CG, or AL. The results showed a significant difference in letter pairs that were similar and letter pairs that were different. The reaction time for similar letter pairs was significantly slower than different letter pairs. It was determined that error rate was also significantly higher for similar letter pairs. The findings of this experiment showed that people have a more difficult time distinguishing between two objects that are similar than two objects that are the same.
Background image of page 2
The Effect of Similarity 3 The Effect of Similarity on Reaction Time and Error Rates by College Students Many theories over time have been used to describe object recognition and the way information is processed in the mind. Template Matching Theory is the earliest theory that said that we have a specific store of images that we compare each new image received in order to recognize specific objects. A problem with this theory is that it would take millions of stored templates in order to recognize one letter, such as C, in all specific forms it can take. A “C” can be lower case or in different orientations that are different from one character to the next, making it nearly impossible to fathom having a specific amount of templates stored for every possible character in every possible direction and orientation it can be seen. Another theory was developed called the Prototype Theory. This theory built off the ideas of the Template Matching Theory, in that it also said that you had a store of specific images and categorized new images into these stored ones. For example, a person would see an image of a cat and compare that image to the prototype that they have stored in order to recognize that the image is a cat, and not a dog. The theory has fundamental issues, such as seeing various different types of animals that resemble a cat, but may be a raccoon, two eyes, two pointed ears, four legs and a long tail. Everything about the description says cat, but it is not, it is a raccoon, part of a different family
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/23/2010 for the course PSY PSY taught by Professor Psych during the Fall '10 term at Wayne State University.

Page1 / 18

Homework 7 - The Effect of Similarity 1 Running head: THE...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online