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Principles_OTHERsolution_ch4

Principles_OTHERsolution_ch4 - Suggested Answers for Mankiw...

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1 Suggested Answers for Mankiw, Chapter 4, “Other” Problems 1. a. Cold weather damages the orange crop, reducing the supply of oranges. This can be seen in Figure 6 as a shift to the left in the supply curve for oranges. The new equilibrium price is higher than the old equilibrium price. Figure 6 b. People often travel to the Caribbean from New England to escape cold weather, so the demand for Caribbean hotel rooms is high in the winter. In the summer, fewer people travel to the Caribbean, because northern climes are more pleasant. The result, as shown in Figure 7, is a shift to the left in the demand curve. The equilibrium price of Caribbean hotel rooms is thus lower in the summer than in the winter, as the figure shows.
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2 Figure 7 c. When a war breaks out in the Middle East, many markets are affected. Because a large proportion of oil production takes place there, the war disrupts oil supplies, shifting the supply curve for gasoline to the left, as shown in Figure 8. The result is a rise in the equilibrium price of gasoline. With a higher price for gasoline, the cost of operating a gas-guzzling automobile like a Cadillac will increase. As a result, the demand for used Cadillacs will decline, as people in the market for cars will not find Cadillacs as attractive. In addition, some people who already own Cadillacs will try to sell them. The result is that the demand curve for used Cadillacs shifts to the left, while the supply curve shifts to the right, as shown in Figure 9. The result is a decline in the equilibrium price of used Cadillacs. Figure 8 Figure 9 2. The statement that "an increase in the demand for notebooks raises the quantity of notebooks demanded, but not the quantity supplied," in general, is false. As Figure 10 shows, the increase in demand for notebooks results in an increased quantity supplied.
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