Phsc112_Ast - Apparent Motion of The Celestial Sphere The...

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Unformatted text preview: Apparent Motion of The Celestial Sphere The latitude of Polaris = Your latitude Apparent Motion of The Celestial Sphere (2) The angle that star trails make relative to vertical Is your latitude. The Celestial Sphere (Example) The Celestial South Pole is not visible from the northern hemisphere. Horizon North Celestial North Pole 33.8 South 56.2 Celestial Equator Horizon Long Beach: l 33.8 Constellations The stars of a constellation only appear to be close to one another Usually, this is only a projection effect . The stars of a constellation may be located at very different distances from us. Summer and Winter Constellations The Suns apparent path on the sky is called the Ecliptic . Equivalent: The Ecliptic is the projection of Earths orbit onto the celestial sphere. Due to Earths revolution around the sun, the sun appears to move through the zodiacal constellations. The Motion of the Planets The planets are orbiting the sun almost exactly in the plane of the Ecliptic....
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This note was uploaded on 04/24/2010 for the course ANTH 7173 taught by Professor George during the Spring '10 term at CSU Long Beach.

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Phsc112_Ast - Apparent Motion of The Celestial Sphere The...

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