1 Mendel & Statistics

1 Mendel & Statistics - Mendelian Analysis Gregor...

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Gregor Mendel, Father of Genetics 1822-1884 Mendelian Analysis
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Mendelian genetics Read: Chapter 3, pp 42 - 53, 56 Principle of dominance Principle of segregation Principle of independent assortment Statistics Multiplication rule (Product rule) Addictive rule (Sum rule) Chi-square test Problems: Chapter 3, 1,3,7,9,11,13,15, 17, 19, 21
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How is genetic information transmitted from one generation to the next? Material: Garden pea
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Mendel Studied 6 Traits in the Garden Peas Each Trait has 2 Mutually Exclusive Phenotypes
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Conclusions of Mendel’s Experiments Traits are transmitted from parents to children Traits have different forms ( dominant and recessive ) Each trait carries two copies of a unit of inheritance (one from the mother and the other from the father) Two forms ( alleles ) of each trait separate ( segregate ) during gamete formation, and unite at random at fertilization ( Law of segregation ) During gamete formation, different pairs of alleles segregate independently ( Law of independent assortment )
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Secrets of Mendel’s success: Pure line (True Breeding)---- limit the number of variables Quantitative results Models that could be tested
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1. Isolated pure breeding line (true breeding) identical phenotypes are observed from generation to generation Procedure of Mendel’s Experiments: P F1 F2
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P Tall X Short F1 Tall F2 Tall Short 3 : 1 self The ability to make short plants is transmitted from P to F1 to F2 …………. The F1 has the genetic information to make tall and short plants
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The size of the plant is determined by a factor ( Gene ). There are two forms of this factor ( alleles ). T and t Mendel proposed Principle of dominance When T and t co-exist in a plant, one observes the T phenotype T: dominant t: recessive Principle of segregation The two alleles, T and t, separate (segregate) during gamete formation, then unite at random, one from each parent, at fertilization.
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P Tall X Short F1 Tall F2 Tall Short 3 : 1 self TT tt tt Tt TT Tt Phenotype Genotype Ratio of phenotype: Tall : Short = 3 : 1 Ratio of genotype: TT : Tt : tt = 1 : 2 : 1 heterozygote homozygote
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F1 female gametes Punnett Square Tt X Tt
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2010 for the course LIFE SCIEN Genetics taught by Professor Chen during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

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1 Mendel & Statistics - Mendelian Analysis Gregor...

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